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provo river parkway

Average Rating:    (2.32 of 5)

No. of Reviews: 19

Mostly gravel, rock sizes vary from pea size to D-cup. Watch out for fat women hiding these large boulders under their lycra. It is the fat women in spandex that keeps this trail from being one of the scenic wonders of the west.
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Latitude
40.23170824032892
Longitude
-111.6811752319336
Trail Directions
Drive west on center street in provo almost to Utah lake state park. Trail begins just past the river by the ducks.
Trail Length
10 miles
Trail Level
Trails for all skill levels
Trail Type
Paved Path
City/County
Provo
   


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Reviews 1 - 5 (19 Reviews Total) View All | Next 5

Review Date
October 11, 2005

Overall Rating
 5 of 5

Aerobic Difficulty
 5 of 5

Technical Difficulty
 5 of 5

Ridden Trail:
Once a week

Visitors rate this review
1.00 of 5, 4.00 votes

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Reviewed by: pepsicola ,  Downhiller

Summary:
There I was, sitting in the colligate guidance office for humanities majors, staring face to face with a pudgy older woman who claimed I needed just one more P.E. class in order to graduate. I stared down at my worn leather shoes, incredulous. I tried to grasp the deeper (if any) meaning of the moment. Any conclusions I attempted to make were blocked by the nauseating sight of a wristwatch being swallowed alive by an overabundance of fatty tissue that had accumulated near the chubby left wrist of the councilor's hand. I shook the thought and stood up, "By God, I will take a tennis class, so help me. " The councilor blankly stared back. I left without saying another word. Weeks later, I found myself a boy among men. In Each and every class we were reduced to running around in short blue cotton shorts and grey t-shirts groping for yellow balls with giant fly swatters. We all desperately tried to follow our teacher’s instructions. She was courageous, and had much patience. Some of us could make contact with the ball, even producing a volley that sometimes would achieve three or four exchanges above the net. I struggled with the bare minimum requirement of hitting the ball just hard enough to place it somewhere within the large painted square on the other side of the three-meter net. Despite her efforts, any attempt to improve my backhand swing was futile. All incoming pitches were inadvertently treated as just another serve in an organized game of home run derby. That summer, I sent hundreds of little yellow balls to their doom: ball after ball managed to sail up and over the large black fence that caged my fellow compatriots and myself for two hours every Tuesday and Thursday afternoon. Before I knew it, five weeks had passed and the jig was up. Just as I was getting used to wearing a mere jock strap underneath those thin cotton blue shorts, the class was over.
A week later, I stood outside in line for an hour under a sweltering August heat that hung in the air like a cloud of death as I waited for commencement to start. The black graduation cape I wore for the occasion stunk like the layers of sweat it carried from the multiple ministers of body odor past occupants left behind (fix the ambiguous subject). During that hour I didn't think of the tennis class or the pudgy graduation counselor. I tried not to think of anything really, but as my gaze wandered about in the afternoon light that dimmed (fix this: it is the light that is dimming, not that the light is dimming.) the large outdoor campus and the throngs of people waiting for their turn to graduate, an untied shoestring caught my eye. My left shoe had become untied. For some unknown reason, the left shoe of this particular pair had a propensity to un-tie itself often. The first person I saw upon rising post-re-tie was a skinny young man with nappy blond hair. He wasn't waiting to graduate, as he was dressed in normal street clothes. His head bobbed up and down as he quickly weaved through the masses of black capes. He appeared to be desperately looking for someone. I watched him for some time. At length he found who he was looking for. Just prior to a warm embrace by a young woman wearing a black cape, she yelled out to the blond man, "hey Phil!” The warm embrace took me by surprise, for I mistook her contorted facial expression for that of sheer terror. I expected the woman to punch the man, not hug him. After a long hug and an accompanying kiss, I caught a better look at her. What I mistook as an expression of horror was the end result of an overly anxious woman coupled with the unjust phenotype of hereditary ugliness. She was so happy to see her lover she broke into tears. I held back the urge to walk over and tear the two apart. I saw my self-holding the two in the air by the nape of their necks speaking to the woman, “ do you realize just how ugly you are?”

Recommended Route:
Seriously, this trail is the the quintensential freeride work out. This trail is incredibly technical, and dangerous. If there exists a triple-black-diamond, this is it. Since the city started allowing the public to build on the trail (Sept. '05) Half of the trail is now elevated on wooden ladders. There are plenty of Air-outs, 2" skinnies, and 14"+ drops to keep you consumed with fear and loathing. Don't come to ride this trail unless you have eight or nine hours to spend haveing the free-ride time of your life. If there ever was a freeride trail to write home to mom about, this is it. Don't let the other reviewers talk this trail down. There were likely on a black-acid trip when they decided that this trail is too weak. These same people are probably some of the best riders out there, hence it seemed so easy for them.

Other recommended trails in the same area:
none, this is the best trail in the universe



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Review Date
June 5, 2003

Overall Rating
 1 of 5

Ridden Trail:
Ridden Once

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Reviewed by: Spiderman , from Pleasant Grove, Utah

Summary:
This is NOT a mountain bike trail! Take the 'ole lady and kids, take an hour so, enjoy the scenery, then jump on just about anywhere up American Fork canyon if you want a real work out ;)

Other recommended trails in the same area:
Silver Fork Lake trail up AF Canyon...can't go wrong...streams, hills, and spectacular scenery...less than 45 minutes from Provo. NICE!



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Review Date
February 9, 2003

Overall Rating
 5 of 5

Ridden Trail:
Once a week

Visitors rate this review
1.00 of 5, 3.00 votes

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Reviewed by: Duppcus , from BYU city

Summary:
This is the best of ever. Many 45+ foot drops for the experienced hucker rider. Super great downhill, but watch out for pedestrians and walkers!! You go around the river and ride on the side walk. Be sure not to cross the yellow lines because you could might crash. This trail is not for the beginner but the beginner could do it in about 2 or 9 hours. Not too much climbing cause you get tired of going up hill it is so much fun and after you can tell people you rode the provo river trail. Its kinda like riding on a side walk but more fun because you are on a mountain bike the whole time.

Recommended Route:
GO from the start to the finnish

Other recommended trails in the same area:
This is the only trail I reccomend!!!!!!1



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Review Date
January 3, 2003

Overall Rating
 1 of 5

Ridden Trail:
Every few months

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Reviewed by: Tom , from Provo, UT

Summary:
I lived right next to this trail. My son learned to ride his bike on this trail. I pulled my other son in a trailer. There are several playgrounds for the kids to stop and play on. It's a good place for a family to get on their bikes/blades/feet and spend some time together. There is a speed limit on this trail (though I don't think it's enforced). It's a good access route to get to some decent trails in Provo Canyon for those that don't want to drive (or you want to warm up a little). It serves a valuable purpose. It gets 5 stars for what it is intended. Every town should have paths like these. But for mountain biking, it gets a big fat zero.

Recommended Route:
It's 20 miles of paved road, but without cars to run over you. During the summer, be prepared to eat bugs (and be eaten by them).



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Review Date
August 8, 2002

Overall Rating
 4 of 5

Ridden Trail:
Once a week

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Reviewed by: maranelloboy , from Orem

Summary:
Recommended for walking, hiking, jogging, and skating. Not for bikers. It's a nice smooth surface most of the way and pretty level. Except going through Orem and Provo, it's very peaceful, and you don't run into many people on the Utah Lake side of the trail. For mountain bikers, I recommend going on the Bonneville shorline trail. For street cyclists, you go too fast. Find somewhere else where there are packs of scouts to murder if you ever hit one.

Recommended Route:
Vivian to Utah Lake (about 15 miles)



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Reviews 1 - 5 (19 Reviews Total) View All | Next 5
 


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